«

»

Evidence of Isolated Tribe Found in the Murunahua Territorial Reserve

March 2013:

A monitoring patrol of the upper Yurua River uncovered evidence of people in voluntary isolation living inside the Murunahua Territorial Reserve. The patrol was a collaborative effort between the Alto Purús National Park, local community vigilance committees, protection agents from the Organización Regional Aidesep Ucayali (ORAU), the Yurua indigenous federation, Aconadiysh, and UAC’s sister organization, ProPurús.

 

A shelter constructed from palm fronds used by isolated people (ProPurús 2013)

The expedition was organized to investigate reports from local people of illegal logging inside the Reserve. While traveling upstream, members discovered what they believed was a logging trail leading up the river bank and into the forest. Approximately 10 meters from the river they found the camp. It was comprised of  eight shelters constructed of palm fronds each with its own cooking fire. Broken turtle shells and various palm frond baskets were scattered about. It seemed as if the camp had been used within the previous few days. After taking a few photos, expedition members left the area immediately and traveled back downstream. Fortunately, there were no signs of illegal logging in the area.

 

The evidence confirms, once again, that at least one isolated tribe lives inside the Murunahua Territorial Reserve, and refutes claims made by government officials and the timber and oil industries that the tribes no longer live there or exist at all. Established  in 1997 to protect people in voluntary isolation, the Reserve covers 480,000 hectares located between the Alto Purús National Park and Brazil. The area of the camp is relatively close to the Envira River where a different tribe was photographed two years ago.

 

Local villagers refer to the isolated people as their “brothers” and often find their camps during the dry season, usually in July or August. This is when the nomadic hunters and gatherers leave the remote headwaters to collect turtle eggs on large rivers like the Yurua. Finding a camp in March, however, is quite rare. Local people believe that mahogany loggers working in western part of the Reserve along the Huacapistea and Mapuya rivers have displaced the tribe, forcing them to move closer to the Yurua.  UAC documented widespread illegal logging in the Reserve in 2010 and again in 2012.

 

Shelters made by isolated hunters and gatherers on the upper Yurua River (ProPurús 2013)

Members of the Yurua Vigilance Committees (ProPurús 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Murunahua Reserve is part of the buffer zone of the Alto Purús National Park. In order to help protect both the Murunahua and the Park, Peru’s park service, Sernanp, and ProPurús have organized 20 men and women from local communities to serve as volunteer Park guards. ProPurús provides patrolling equipment and technical training that the committees need to effectively protect the Reserve and Park, as well as their own titled communal lands.

Yurua Vigilance Committee members and their families (ProPurús 2013)

Additional information:

2012 UAC report on illegal logging in the Murunahua

2010 UAC report in illegal logging in the Murunahua

News from website Servindi.org