Chris Fagan

Author's posts

Murder in the Peruvian Rainforest

September 9, 2014: Last week, Edwin Chota, leader of the Asheninka community of Saweto, was murdered along with Jorge Ríos Pérez, Leoncio Quinticima Melendez, and Francisco Pinedo as they traveled on a forest trail to attend a meeting in the Brazilian community ofApiwtxa. The men had spent over a decade fighting to title Saweto, and they were killed just days after a visit from Peruvian forestry officials to document continued illegal logging on their lands. We are working with the widows and family members of the four slain leaders to ensure that the government conducts a full investigation and the perpetrators are brought to justice. We look forward to working together with all of Saweto’s friends and supporters to carry on …

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Isolated Tribe Village Documented for the First Time In Peru’s Alto Purús Region

September 2014: Two clusters of houses used by isolated indigenous tribes have been discovered inside the Purús Communal Reserve. The tribes were known to live in the region, as members are occasionally seen during the dry season when they travel from the remote headwaters to the larger rivers to collect turtle eggs. This is the first evidence, however, that they live in semi-permanent villages, providing invaluable information on their territory and land use needed to develop effective plans for their protection. The Purús Communal Reserve serves as a buffer zone between the Alto Purús National Park and an area of settled indigenous communities on the Purús River (see map). The two small villages are separated by approximately 200 meters and are …

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UAC Responds to Isolated Tribes Crisis

August 2014: UAC and its sister organization, ProPurús, are implementing emergency contingency plans in response to the previously isolated tribe initiating contact with villagers on the Envira River near the Brazil – Peru border. Twenty-four members of the tribe have chosen to stay and live near the village, at least for now. The rest have returned to the forest. Earlier this month, ProPurús staff led a team of isolated tribes experts from Peru’s Ministry of Culture to the Yurua River, located near the Envira, to conduct emergency training for local villagers on how to react if similar contact events happen there. Peru hopes to learn from errors made during the Envira contact, when seven tribespeople became sick. Fortunately, Brazil’s isolated tribes agency, …

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Alto Purús is most important protected area for carbon storage in Peru

A new study by Stanford University found that the forests of the Alto Purús National Park store more carbon than any other protected area in Peru. The groundbreaking report, complete with high-resolution 3-D maps, provides a new way for Peru to fight climate change. Long recognized for its critical role in protecting Amazonian fauna and flora, as well as some of the world’s last isolated tribes, the study highlights the Park’s importance as a carbon sink. By quantifying carbon storage in vegetation throughout the entire country, the maps provide a tool for prioritizing strategies for preventing deforestation and slowing climate change. The results of the two-year study will become particularly important in negotiating prices for carbon offset projects. A limiting …

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New video of recent contact event on the Envira River

July 2014: Brazil released a video documenting the contact event between a formerly isolated tribe and villagers on the Envira River. See video here The tribe explained that they had come from across the border in the Alto Purús National Park and had suffered attacked from armed non-indigenous people, most likely narcotic traffickers. Several tribesman have machetes, indicating previous contact with people with access to manufactured goods. Several members of the group were treated for the flu. It is not known whether it spread to the rest of the tribe. With no immunity to illnesses from the outside world, these contact events often result in devastating epidemics.  Additional information available here.  

Isolated Tribe Initiates Contact with Villagers near Peru-Brazil Border

July 21, 2014: Update: Members of the tribe that initiated contact with villagers on Brazil’s Envira River contracted influenza during contact. They were treated by FUNAI medical personnel and have since rejoined the rest of their tribe in the forest. FUNAI reports that the tribe sought contact to escape recent violent attacks by narcotic traffickers who use these remote borderlands to transport coca paste from Peru to Brazil.  See Survival International’s website for more information. See UAC’s original post from July 15th below. July 15, 2014: In June, a tribe of voluntarily isolated people, also referred to as “uncontacteds,” emerged from the forest and entered a remote Ashaninka indigenous village on Brazil’s Envira River. The group of approximately 60 men, …

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Oil and Gas Exploration in the Yurua Threatens Voluntarily Isolated Tribes

February 2014 After an aggressive publicity campaign orchestrated by Peru’s state-owned oil company, Perúpetro, directed at indigenous leaders of the Yurua region, the Yurua’s indigenous federation, Aconadiysh, signed a preliminary agreement to allow oil and gas exploration in their lands. Concession 169 covers approximately 400,000 hectares of extremely remote and relatively undisturbed forest along the Ucayali, Peru and Acre, Brazil border. (See map). In addition to overlapping with a dozen indigenous communities and state forestry lands, the concession includes 100,000 hectares that have been proposed as a communal reserve for the indigenous communities. UAC and its sister organization, ProPúrus, have been working with the Yurua’s indigenous communities since 2006. In late 2013, we began a collaborative project with Aconadiysh and Peru’s …

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